Be mindful, even if your mind is full

older-and-far-away:

gingerhaole:

queenanunnaki:

Easter Island’s Statues Reveal Bodies Covered With Unknown Ancient Petroglyphs

21 January, 2014

MessageToEagle.com - Standing some 2,000 miles west of Chile, on the Easter Island, 887 mysterious giant statues have intrigued scientists and the public for years.

For a long time it was believed that the massive statutes consisted of just the heads.

However, in October 2011, when the Easter Island Statue Project began its Season V expedition, scientists could reveal remarkable photos showing that the bodies of the statues go far deeper underground than just about anyone had imagined.

Project director Jo Anne Van Tilburg said: “Our EISP excavations recently exposed the torsos of two 7m tall statues.

The statutes on Easter Island have bodies covered with ancient undeciphered petroglyphs.

"We found a round, deep post hole into which the Rapa Nui had inserted a tree trunk," she said. Van Tilburg said ropes were attached to the tree trunk and to the partially carved statue. "We found a rope guide that was actually carved into the bedrock near the statue." The Rapa Nui then used the tree trunk to raise the statue upright. Before the statue was upright, they carved its front. Once it stood erect, they finished the back, Van Tilburg explained.

The excavation team also found about 800 grams of natural red pigment —nearly two pounds —in the burial hole, along with a human burial. Van Tilburg believes the pigment was used to paint the statues, just as the Rapa Nui used pigment to paint their bodies for certain ceremonies.

The unusually large amount of pigment found indicates that it might have been used by a priest or chief, perhaps as part of mortuary practice, she said. Human bones were found throughout the dig, indicating that people buried their dead around the statues.

Hundreds, perhaps thousands, of visitors to the island have been astonished to see that, indeed, Easter Island statues have bodies!

More important, however, we discovered a great deal about the Rapa Nui techniques of ancient engineering.”

Among their discoveries, the team discovered:

· The dirt and detritus partially burying the statues was washed down from above and not deliberatelyplaced there to bury, protect, or support the statues

· The statues were erected in place and stand on stone pavements

· Post holes were cut into bedrock to support upright tree trunks

· Rope guides were cut into bedrock around the post holes

· Posts, ropes, stones, and different types of stone tools were all used to carve and raise the statues upright

The two “heads” in the quarry where Van Tilburg’s team dug are standing figures with torsos, truncated at the waist, that have become partially buried by eroded dirt and detritus over centuries.

The team also discovered that ceremonies were certainly associated with the statues.

On the project website, Van Tilburg said: “We found large quantities of red, some of which may have been used to paint the statues.

Finally, and perhaps most poignantly, we found in the pavement under one statue a single stone carved with a crescent symbol said to represent a canoe, or vaka.

The backs of both statues are covered with petroglyphs, many of which are also vaka.

A direct connection between the vaka symbol and the identity of the artist or group owning the statue is strongly suggested.”

Still, many of these ancient petroglyphs remain undeciphered and the history of one of the most remote islands in the world is now even more mysterious than ever.

MessageToEagle.com
Image credit: EISP.ORG

This is fuckin’ boss!

But seriously, I love how for the longest time everyone was just like ‘yep. Giant heads. just giant heads.’ and no one even ever bothered to check.
You know what happens when you make an assumption, guys.

scienceyoucanlove:

Bodies on Everest

Of the­ 189 people who have died in their attempts, an estimated 120 of them remain there [source:philippine-everest.com]. This is a gruesome reminder to those who attempt to reach the summit of just how perilous it can be. The simple reason that the bodies of dead climbers are scattered aboutMount Everest is that it’s too dangerous and difficult to try to remove them. Reaching the summit of Everest is a physical challenge unlike any other on Earth. To attempt to bring a dead body or a stranded climber down would take too long and likely leave the climbing team stranded overnight. This makes rescue attempts virtually suicidal.

Most of the bodies are located in the “Death Zone,” the area above the final base camp at 26,000 feet (8,000 meters). No one has ever studied the cause of death, but fatigue and the elements certainly play a large part. Many of the bodies are frozen in time, the corpses in tact with climbing rope still around their waists. Other bodies lie in various states of decay. Because of this, some experienced Everest climbers have made efforts in recent years to bury some of the more accessible bodies on the mountain. Climbing teams from China have led expeditions to clean up some of the estimated 120 tons of trash left behind each year [source: ABC News]. During these clean up efforts, the team plans to remove any bodies it can safely reach and carry back down.

In 2007, Ian Woodall, a British climber, returned to Everest to bury the bodies of three climbers he passed on his way to the summit. One of the climbers, a woman named Francys Arsentiev, was still alive when Woodall reached her during his initial ascent. Her first words to him were “don’t leave me behind.” The grim reality, though, is that Woodall could not have done anything for her without jeopardizing his own life or the lives of his team members. He was forced to leave her to perish alone.

Climbing Mount Everest has become much safer over the past decade thanks to advances in technology and climbing gear. Satellite phones allow a climber to stay in contact with base camp to get constant updates on weather systems in the area. A better understanding of exactly what kind and how much gear to take has also caused the death toll to drop dramatically. In 1996, there were 15 deaths and a total of 98 successful summits. Just 10 years later in 2006, there were only 11 deaths and an estimated 400 summits [source: Outside Magazine]. The total fatality rate over the past 56 years is nine percent, but as of 2004 that percentage had dropped to about 4.4 percent [source: wisegeek.com].

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